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The difference between caring and caring enough to do something

Las Vegas

Scrum Gathering Las Vegas 2013

My take on the Scrum Gathering in Las Vegas 2013

Pomodoro timer

The Pomodoro Technique – Timeboxing with a Purpose

The Pomodoro Technique is something I started reading about when I began doing Agile. It’s all about timeboxing and how it can be used to efficiently manage everyday things by “elliminating the anxiety of time” and “enhancing focus and concentration”. The technique specifically counts time in “Pomodoros” – 25 minute timeboxes in which to concentrate on only one task. Here I describe how to use this technique for Agile meetings and personal productivity.

Sunk Cost

Sunk costs – when to cut your losses

A sunk cost is an accounting term referring to something (e.g. a project) that has been heavily invested in without success and will not continue to be funded. In these situations, often more money or time has been spent than is wise and it continues because so much has already been invested. The mantra is…
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Can Companies be Servant Leaders?

Wikipedia states that servant leadership is both a leadership philosophy and set of leadership practices. Traditional leadership generally involves the accumulation and exercise of power by one at the “top of the pyramid.” By comparison, the servant-leader shares power, puts the needs of others first and helps people develop and perform as highly as possible.

When we refer to servant leadership in Scrum it is at the team level. A ScrumMaster is the servant leader for the Scrum team. They do all the steps the definition above refers to and more. This is all great for the Scrum team, but what about everyone else, the ScrumMasters included? Who is their servant leader? Can companies step in and supplement for this role?

Why making things “easier” makes them harder: The argument against modifying Scrum

I’m sure many ScrumMasters implementing have heard this or similar: we’re not like other teams; we do things differently; Scrum won’t work in our organization. The result is usually: “let’s modify Scrum so the adjustment is easier on the team/organization/processes.” Sound familiar? Well I’m going to call that bluff.