Tag: timeboxing

The difference between caring and caring enough to do something

So what’s the big deal with carryover? Lemme tell you about WASTE

Talking to a team about carryover at a daily scrum meeting led me into a very uncomfortable confrontation with someone who already didn’t like me. Not sure why but I ascertained it had something to do with the unhealthy relationship between product and technology organizations and the fact that product was pushed by sales to make commitments on behalf of the teams that were essentially never met on time (more on that issue in a later post). So a contentious confrontation – read on…

Gaming the metrics is GOOD!

I’m going to start off by saying that I know Scrum and metrics don’t necessarily get along. But I will also acknowledge that it’s a necessary evil in most cases. And in a lot of cases it doesn’t have to be evil. Metrics are simply: a method of measuring something. In Scrum, we measure a lot of things. We measure the size of our work items, we measure the effort or time it takes to complete them. We measure our accuracy. All of this is in our quest to become predictable as a team and to improve (and we need to start with a baseline measurement to know if we’ve improved). But when others start taking notice of our metrics, that’s when things get tricky.

hands typing blog

Overcoming blogger’s block and making the time to blog

On my quest for Agile blogging notoriety, I am often faced with the dilemma of what to blog about and how often. Some books advise daily blogging, some weekly, though all say more is better. But who has the time? And the ideas? So how to solve this problem? I don’t think there is really one solution, just some mitigation techniques and advice I can offer. Here are some things I do to document my ideas for blogs and try and blog more frequently.

Pomodoro timer

The Pomodoro Technique – Timeboxing with a Purpose

The Pomodoro Technique is something I started reading about when I began doing Agile. It’s all about timeboxing and how it can be used to efficiently manage everyday things by “elliminating the anxiety of time” and “enhancing focus and concentration”. The technique specifically counts time in “Pomodoros” – 25 minute timeboxes in which to concentrate on only one task. Here I describe how to use this technique for Agile meetings and personal productivity.