Tag: women in technology

The difference between caring and caring enough to do something

How do companies make themselves stand out via interviews?

When interviewing for jobs, you want to leave the a memorable impression on the interviewers and company you’re interviewing with. But what about the opposite? Shouldn’t the company be focusing on leaving a memorable impression on you? I’ve been interviewing extensively over the past few weeks looking for my next contract, and a lot of the interviews melt together. Some, however, stand out very clearly and make me positively remember how the particular companies differentiated themselves in my head. Here are a few examples on how you can leave a memorable impression on potential employees and stand out from the hoard of other companies they are inevitably interviewing with in the high demand IT/Agile industry.

I don’t have all the answers…and it’s ok!

Coming up on Agile2015 is hitting me right in the feels. This will be my fourth Agile Alliance conference, my fourth job in as many years (actually fifth), my second time presenting at an Agile Alliance conference, my second time presenting in Washington D.C., and my first time really feeling like I have no idea what I’m doing.

Women in Agile Research Project – Help Needed! Men welcome, too!

As some of you know, I am completing my Master of Art in Organizational Leadership concentrating in Strategic Management this semester. As part of my graduation requirements, I need to complete a leadership action project. I chose a project to understand why women are less involved in the Agile community than men.

I conducted interviews with seven women to discuss the issue and based on their responses came up with some key themes. I am using a survey to validate these themes and potentially gather new themes around why people are involved and why women are less involved. You can help by taking the survey and passing it on to your Agile counterparts. Men’s input is welcome, too!

Sponsorship vs. Mentorship – what’s the difference?

There are many articles out there that talk about the importance of having a mentor, especially for women. Sheryl Sandberg discusses it in Lean In. Companies have mentoring programs for new employees, employees who have been there for awhile, and veteran employees. There is co-mentorship, reverse mentorship, peer mentorship, executive mentorship and every type of mentorship in between – but what we’re missing is sponsorship.

Review of Lean In book

In a break from my personal branding series I have posted a review of Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg on the Women In Agile site. There are some book club type questions to get the discussion started. I’d love to hear what others are thinking, good or bad. Enjoy!